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Hulu Summer Film School Course Syllabus

August 5th, 2014 by Kelly Lin

Whether they’re transporting us into a world of fantasy or revealing a deeper truth of our present moment, great films have a way of touching our hearts and changing how we look at the world. Using elements such as sound, cinematography, and lighting, filmmakers are able to tell powerful stories and create moments that are unforgettable. This summer, we’ll be examining these elements of filmmaking through some of the films that employ them best.

Miss a lesson or looking to review one from the past? Well look no further! Here you can find links to all our articles from previous weeks of Hulu Summer Film School. We’ll also be updating this post regularly as the new lessons are released. Happy learning!

1) Introduction to Story Structure and Screenwriting by Hulu Staff

2) The Three Act Structure: The Repeating Phantasm of Story by Jonathan Katz

3) Famous Screenwriters: Not Always an Oxymoron by Christopher Rowe

4) Links and Additional Resources for the Aspiring Screenwriter by Kelly Lin


1) Introduction to Cinematography by Hulu Staff

2) A Feast for the Eyes: Dissecting the Cinematography in Jiro Dreams of Sushi by Kelly Lin


1) Introduction to Color Theory and Lighting Selections by Hulu Staff

2) Lighting Persona by Michael Koresky of the Criterion Collection



1) Introduction to Soundtrack, Score, and Sound Design by Hulu Staff

2) Setting the Score with Source by Jonathan Katz


1) Introduction to Costumes and Set Design by Hulu Staff 

2) Valley Girls and Alien Hunks: The Cool Costumes of Earth Girls are Easy by Rookie Magazine writer Marie Lodi 



1) Introduction to Animation by Hulu Staff 

2) The Secret of Animation: An Exploration of the Guiding Principles behind The Secret of Kells by Kelly Lin 



1) Introduction to Post-Production by Hulu Staff

2) Making the Cut by Jonathan Katz

And that’s a wrap! This project was put together by a bunch of passionate film buffs at Hulu and we really appreciate you tuning in each week to learn about film. We hope you’ve looked at movies a different way and learned something you didn’t know before!

Best,
The Hulu Summer Film School Team

Last comment: Oct 13th 2015 3 Comments

A Feast for the Eyes: Dissecting the Cinematography of “Jiro Dreams of Sushi”

July 25th, 2014 by Kelly Lin

Editor’s Note: This post is in conjunction with a special summer program on Hulu called Hulu Summer Film School. This summer, Hulu is using some of your favorite films to explore how filmmakers use elements such as sound, cinematography, and lighting to tell powerful stories and create moments that are unforgettable. Learn more at hulu.com/film-school. 

In Jiro Dreams of Sushi, cinematographer David Gelb uses a variety of angles, framing, and compositions to capture Jiro’s world. Let’s take a closer look at the different camera shots Gelb uses to construct the overall style of Jiro and inject deeper meaning into the images.

1) Medium Close Up - A standard for interviews in the talking head style, the medium close-up frames the subject from just below the shoulders to the top of the head.

2) Wide Shot – In this shot, the entire subject is shown as well as their surrounding area. As a result, we are able to see both Jiro’s son, Yoshikazu, and the actions he is performing.

3) Extreme Wide Shot - Gelb uses this extreme wide shot to establish the subject in relation to the surrounding area.

4) Extreme Close Up - This is a tight shot that focuses on a part of the face. The motivation of the shot is to magnify detail.

5) Dolly Shot - In a dolly shot, the camera is placed on a track and moves forward or backwards to slowly reveal parts of the frame.

6) Tracking Shot – In this shot, the camera moves with the subject, making sure to keep them in frame.

7) Fish Eye Shot – This shot uses a fish eye lens to create an interesting visual distortion. Notice that the center of the image is the widest and the most in focus while the rest of the image is slightly blurred and a bit skinnier.

8) Pan Shot - In the pan shot, the camera stays in the same position, but moves on a tripod from right to left, or in this case, left to right.

9) Tilt Shot – In this shot, the camera stays in the same position, but moves on a tripod from up to down or down to up.

10) Cut-In- The cut-in is a shot that focuses on a part of the subject in detail. In this case, the emphasis of the shot is on Jiro’s hands.

Another beautiful cut-in.

Did we mention this film has beautiful cut-ins?

 

If a production team were a kitchen staff, then the cinematographer would be its chef. By employing a variety of shots throughout the film, David Gelb is able to capture the beauty of Jiro and his craft, turning each frame into a mouthwatering delight.

Visit the Hulu Summer Film School page to watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi and learn more about cinematography.

Last comment: Aug 2nd 2014 4 Comments